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On February 14, rockfish your world with sustainable seafood

Healthy Oceans | February 11, 2016 | Leave a comment

By Kyle Empringham

Love is in the air! Valentine's Day is fast approaching and there are plenty of sustainable seafood options for you to create a delicious and romantic evening.

If you're heading to a restaurant, choose one that includes sustainable seafood menu options. Don't believe everything you're herring... Ask your server about their sustainable seafood choices.

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It's time to protect the Great Bear Rainforest's grizzlies

Science Matters | February 11, 2016 | Leave a comment
Photo: It's time to protect the Great Bear Rainforest's grizzlies

(Credit: Kathryn Burrington via Flickr.)

By David Suzuki with contributions from David Suzuki Foundation Ontario and Northern Canada Director Faisal Moola.

The agreement between government, industry, First Nations and environmental groups to protect much of the Great Bear Rainforest should be celebrated. The deal makes almost 85 per cent of the forested land base in this massive region on B.C.'s coast off limits to logging. Forestry in the remaining 15 per cent will follow "lighter-touch" practices, called "ecosystem-based management". Most importantly, First Nations will have greater decision-making authority over industrial development on their lands.

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Federal clean tech and municipal funds help environment and economy

Climate & Clean Energy | February 10, 2016 | Leave a comment
Photo: Federal clean tech and municipal funds help environment and economy

(Credit: Matt Gibson via Flickr)

By Steve Kux Climate and Clean Energy Communications Specialist

The federal government's latest commitment to provide $2 billion over four years to support the Canadian clean technology sector and invest $31.5 million in municipal environmental projects demonstrates an understanding of three important facts about tackling climate change:

  1. Cities and small-scale renewable energy projects are critical to a larger strategy to drive down emissions and adapt to the impacts of climate change.
  2. Canada's clean tech sector represents not only an incredible opportunity to reduce carbon emissions, it is also the key to building a stable, 21st century economy for Canada and providing good jobs for Canadians that are not won and lost on commodity prices.
  3. Natural assets have clear advantages over those constructed by people. They are cheaper to operate and maintain, provide ecosystem services, do not depreciate and have a carbon advantage. But they are not accounted for in municipal budgets, leaving them prone to deterioration.
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Natural capital innovation at the municipal level

Photo: Natural capital innovation at the municipal level

Cities and towns, like Gibsons, B.C., are putting a value on nature and placing it at the heart of their decision-making. (Credit: Bob Cotter via Flickr)

A growing number of municipal governments in Canada are becoming leaders in environmental innovation. One of those innovations involves a natural capital management approach where municipalities are making financial and risk management cases for preserving their natural capital assets. This is how cities and towns, like Gibsons, B.C., are putting a value on nature and placing it at the heart of their decision-making.

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How to be a backyard bird scientist

Queen of Green | February 9, 2016 | Leave a comment
Photo: How to be a backyard bird scientist

Backyard bird feeders attract more than songbirds! Meet the Cooper's Hawk. (Credit: Theresa Hannah)

Scientists asked themselves, "How can we create a real-time snapshot of bird populations around the world?"

The answer: You and me!

Once upon a time, I birded for a living. But this is great beginner fun. And like any hobby, you'll get better with practice.

Ten reasons not to miss The Great Backyard Bird Count (19th annual) from February 12 to 15, 2016:

  1. It's a great way to help teach kids to count
  2. You only need 15 minutes (but you can do it longer if you want)
  3. It's an opportunity to finally correctly identify that little brown bird
  4. El Nino means you might spot a rare species
  5. It's free
  6. You can try a new DIY project — a fat block bird feeder (contains nuts)
  7. It's important: Researchers need you and me to help get the "big picture" about bird populations
  8. You can do it anywhere (you don't even need a backyard...)
  9. People around the world are doing it
  10. It'll make you an official citizen scientist @SciStarter. (Warning: it can be highly addictive and you could find yourself swabbing frogs for the chytrid fungus or mapping moth distribution during National Moth Week in July.)
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Want to eat healthier? Sustainable seafood is a great choice

Healthy Oceans | February 4, 2016 | Leave a comment
Photo: Want to eat healthier? Sustainable seafood is a great choice

(Credit: Thomas Bjorkan)

By Theresa Beer, Senior Communications Specialist

Did you know that ounce for ounce, salmon delivers more omega-3 fatty acids than most types of fish?

Health Canada recommends eating fish — especially oily fish such as char, herring, mackerel, salmon, sardines and trout — at least twice a week for its heart-protective benefits. Many of these fish are also good choices from a sustainability perspective, according to SeaChoice.

Omega-3 fatty acids can be destroyed by excessive heat when cooking. Baking, broiling, steaming and poaching is the best way to keep them. Smoked salmon is smoked at a low temperature and is usually higher in omega-3 fatty acids than cooked salmon.

Other oily fish that are in the most sustainable "green" category include: Arctic char, Atlantic mackerel, Pacific sardine and some species of farmed trout.

The revamped WildSalmonRecipes.com website highlights wild salmon recipes from some of the West Coast's most celebrated chefs.

Add some colour to your repertoire with three pepper wild salmon loaf. Add some spice by trying out chili grilled salmon with mango salsa.

Solar: A brilliant way to get energy

Science Matters | February 3, 2016 | 3 comments
Photo: Solar: A brilliant way to get energy
(Credit: NAIT via Flickr)

By David Suzuki with contributions from David Suzuki Foundation Senior Editor Ian Hanington.

Except for nuclear and geothermal, all energy we use comes from the sun in one form or another. As sunlight reaches the Earth's surface, it powers heat transfers that move air and ocean currents, used for wind and tidal power. The sun evaporates water, contributing to the hydrologic cycle that fills reservoirs for hydroelectricity.

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