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Oil and plastic are choking the planet

Science Matters | May 25, 2017 | Leave a comment
Photo: Oil and plastic are choking the planet

(Credit: John Schneider via Flickr)

By David Suzuki with contributions from David Suzuki Foundation Senior Editor Ian Hanington.

People who deny that humans are wreaking havoc on the planet's life-support systems astound me. When confronted with the obvious damage we're doing to the biosphere — from climate change to water and air pollution to swirling plastic patches in the oceans — some dismiss the reality or employ logical fallacies to discredit the messengers.

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Is it time to celebrate plans for largest marine protected area in Canada?

Healthy Oceans | May 25, 2017
Photo: Is it time to celebrate plans for largest marine protected area in Canada?

(Credit: John Hillard via flickr)

By Panos Grames, Senior Communications Specialist

The federal government deserves a pat on the back for its announcement on May 24 that it plans to protect 140,000 square kilometres of ocean off the west coast of Vancouver Island, stretching out to the western edge of Canada's 200-mile exclusive economic zone. Covering an area twice the size of New Brunswick, this proposed marine protected area would encompass spectacular seamounts (underwater mountains) and hydrothermal vents, which have important ecosystem functions.

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People just like you are building a better future for us all

Queen of Green | May 23, 2017 | Leave a comment
Photo: People just like you are building a better future for us all

Tsimka Martin guiding a traditional Tla-o-qui-aht canoe tour for T'ashii Paddle School.

"In a world of more than seven billion people, each of us is a drop in the bucket. But with enough drops, we can fill any bucket." ~ David Suzuki

Across the nation, innovative people from every walk of life are promoting biodiversity, climate solutions and the right to a healthy environment where they live. Each month, Queen of Green will feature someone using their unique gifts to build a greener future for everyone.

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Bloor bike lane a boon to business, safety

Photo: Bloor bike lane a boon to business, safety

(Credit: Dylan Passmore via Flickr)

By Gideon Forman, Transportation Policy Analyst

Nine months after Toronto launched its Bloor bike lane, is the project a success? There's much evidence to suggest it is.

A survey released by the city in February shows 64 per cent of resident and business respondents believe the lane provides safety for cyclists while allowing acceptable traffic flow and parking. Nearly two-thirds of motorists say they feel "comfortable" driving next to cyclists now — compared to just 14 per cent in 2015, before the lane was installed.

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Increased awareness is key to resolving the climate crisis

Science Matters | May 18, 2017 | 1 comment
Photo: Increased awareness is key to resolving the climate crisis

By David Suzuki with contributions from David Suzuki Foundation Senior Editor Ian Hanington.

Most people understand that human-caused climate change is a real and serious threat. True, some still reject the mountains of evidence amassed by scientists from around the world over many decades, and accepted by every legitimate scientific academy and institution. But as the physical evidence builds daily — from increasingly frequent and intense extreme weather events like droughts and floods to disappearing polar ice to rising sea levels — it takes an incredible amount of denial to claim we have no reason to worry.

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Four edible "weeds"

Queen of Green | May 15, 2017 | 1 comment
Photo: Four edible

Nutritious and delicious Miner's lettuce salad (Photo Credit: Brendan Harris)

As spring blooms, people often rid their yards and gardens of "weeds" in preparation for a fresh start. But a "weed" is a valueless or undesirable plant. And that's a matter of perspective!

Enrich your diet with these four edibles that are as delicious as they are common. (You'll also avoid harmful herbicides and support beneficial insects.)

Chickweed
ChickweedWhiteNS.jpg

This spade-leafed plant has small white flowers. Tastes like spinach. High in beta carotene, calcium, magnesium and zinc. Look for it at the edges of pavement, garden beds and gravel areas. At night, it "sleeps" by folding its leaves over the buds and new shoots. Use it to make delicious chickweed pakoras!

Dandelion
DandelionCompressed.jpg

Find these bright yellow flowers in fields, lawns and garden edges. They're high in Vitamins A, B, C and D, as well as iron, potassium and zinc. Every part of the plant is edible, from the roots to the blossom! Add blossoms to brighten up any salad. Try this recipe for dandy tempura.

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Long work hours don't work for people or the planet

Science Matters | May 11, 2017 | 3 comments
Photo: Long work hours don't work for people or the planet

(Credit: Thomanication via Flickr)

By David Suzuki with contributions from David Suzuki Foundation Senior Editor Ian Hanington.

In 1926, U.S. automaker Henry Ford reduced his employees' workweek from six eight-hour days to five, with no pay cuts. It's something workers and labour unions had been calling for, and it followed previous reductions in work schedules that had been as high as 84 to 100 hours over seven days a week.

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