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How to write a love letter to nature

Photo: How to write a love letter to nature

David Suzuki Foundation staff wrote letters to nature.

We're partnering with the Love Lettering Project during our annual May 30×30 Nature Challenge. (Even though nature takes mail all year round...)

Reflect on what you love most about nature.

I told nature I think it makes the best babysitter, picks me up when I get down, smells better than the city and looks great in the dark.

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Divest from damage and invest in a healthier future

Photo: Divest from damage and invest in a healthier future

(Credit: Chris Yakimov via Flickr)

By David Suzuki with contributions from David Suzuki Foundation Senior Editor Ian Hanington.

If people keep rapidly extracting and burning fossil fuels, there’s no hope of meeting the 2015 Paris Agreement climate change commitments. To ensure a healthy, hopeful future for humanity, governments must stick to their pledge to limit global warming to 1.5 or 2 C above pre-industrial levels by 2050. Many experts agree that to meet that goal, up to 80 per cent of oil, coal and gas reserves must stay in the ground. That makes fossil fuels a bad investment — what analysts call “stranded assets”.

Putting money toward things that benefit humanity, whether investing in clean energy portfolios or implementing energy-saving measures in your home or business, is better for the planet and the bottom line than sinking it into outdated industries that endanger humanity.

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A healthy biosphere means healthier humans

Science Matters | April 28, 2016 | Leave a comment
Photo: A healthy biosphere means healthier humans

(Credit: MaxGag via Flickr).

By David Suzuki

Imagine if scientists came up with an inexpensive, easily administered way to decrease the risk of cancer, diabetes, heart disease, stroke and obesity by 25 to 35 per cent. It would create a sensation and, if patented, would be worth billions. But there’s already a free and simple way to achieve this: exercise.

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How to get to know nature

Queen of Green | April 26, 2016 | 5 comments
Photo: How to get to know nature

Be quiet and seek solitude. (Credit: Jennifer Rodriguez)

You love nature.

Together we even coined a term to describe what happens when we're not getting enough of it: "Treeprived".

For a fifth year, I ask you to immerse yourself in nature for 30 minutes a day for 30 days. We call it our 30×30 Nature Challenge. You might call it walking or biking to work, a lunch break outside, a walking meeting, a hike or time in the garden.

What else might you do for 30 minutes (minimum) a day? Well, there's a book for that: The Big Book of Nature Activities: A Year-Round Guide to Outdoor Learning, by Jacob Rodenburg and Drew Monkman. (Win a copy by commenting on this blog.) Here are 10 tips from the authors:

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Shocking migratory changes bring electric rays to Canada's Pacific

Science Matters | April 21, 2016 | Leave a comment
Photo: Shocking migratory changes bring electric rays to Canada's Pacific

Pacific electric ray (Credit: California Department of Fish and Wildlife via Flickr)

By David Suzuki with contributions from David Suzuki Foundation senior research scientist Scott Wallace.

Gary Krause was mystified by an unusual fish he caught in his trawl net off B.C.’s Pacific north coast in October. It was a Pacific electric ray, named for a pair of organs behind its head that can knock a human adult down with a powerful shock.

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REaDY Summit 2016 focuses on hope and action

Photo: REaDY Summit 2016 focuses on hope and action

Richmond Earth Day speech contestants at city council chamber

By Winnie Hwo, Senior Public Engagement Specialist

Protecting the environment is a family affair, and there is nothing more telling than the excitement and pride students and their parents shared at the annual REaDY Summit speech contest. Typically, the speech contest takes place a month before the April 23 half-day event. This year's theme is "Change happens now; our future is rooted in our backyard."

"We need to save our planet, so when future generations grow up and become parents, their children will not have to face the problems we fear today," Abbas Bimji, a Grade 7 student from Water Lee Elementary, told the audience at the speech contest in a packed council chamber in early March. "We won't let our nightmares get to us. United, we can save our earth."

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On Earth Day, celebrate changes that make oceans healthier

Healthy Oceans | April 20, 2016 | Leave a comment
Photo: On Earth Day, celebrate changes that make oceans healthier

Chef Ian Lai prepares an easy and delicious sablefish recipe (Credit: Barry J Brady Photography)

By Theresa Beer, Senior Communications Specialist

On April 22, we celebrate Earth Day. Choosing sustainable seafood is a great way to leave a smaller footprint on the planet. Here are some ways that supporting sustainable seafood improves ocean health and fishing and aquaculture practices.

Better fishing practices: The Pacific Groundfish Trawl Habitat Agreement has been recognized for its groundbreaking approach to reforming fishing practices to reduce bottom-trawling impacts on sensitive seafloor habitats. The trawl agreement, which the Foundation helped facilitate, is the first in the world to set up a quota system to limit habitat damage, especially to highly impacted deep water corals and sponges. There were just four fishing boundary infractions in the agreement's first year and the fleet's coral and sponge bycatch was only 10 per cent of the allowable limit. One of Canada's most criticized fisheries is now being recognized for its self-imposed regulations to reduce harmful impacts.

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