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Our corporate partners take the 30x30 Nature Challenge to work

Photo: Our corporate partners take the 30x30 Nature Challenge to work

Genuine Health staff in Toronto celebrating the launch of 30×30 Nature Challenge 2015.

In the four years since it first launched, our 30×30 Nature Challenge has helped thousands of people across Canada and around the world spend more time outdoors. People get into "the nature habit" — and they're happier and healthier as a result, as shown in research conducted by Elizabeth Nisbet 30×30 report.pdf of Trent University. Nurturing a connection to nature also makes people care about protecting it.

This wildly popular program would not have been possible without the generous support of our corporate partners, who helped fund the project AND made it come alive at their workplaces. Here's how they describe their 30×30 experience:

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Canada's booming clean technology industry will bust without political support

Photo: Canada's booming clean technology industry will bust without political support

(Credit: Shutterstock)

By Steve Kux, Communications & Research Specialist and Ian Bruce, Science and Policy Manager

Canada's opportunity to become a global leader in innovation and clean technology may be slipping away, according to a new report released today by Analytica Advisors. The fourth installment of their annual report on the state of this increasingly important industry says that Canada has lost 41 per cent of its global market share since 2008 — the third largest loss of any country measured.

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Five reasons to have a sole-ful meal

Healthy Oceans | May 27, 2015 | Leave a comment
Photo: Five reasons to have a sole-ful meal

Fried sole is a classic dish that never gets old. (Credit: lhongchou via flickr)

By Public Engagement Specialist Kyle Empringham

If you're looking for a tasty and affordable seafood option for your next meal, consider sole.

Sole is related to a whole suite of flatfish, often marketed as flounder, halibut, plaice, sanddab and turbot. Pacific flatfish, like their Atlantic counterparts, are known as "hirame" when prepared for sushi.

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How not to squelch a kid's curiosity about nature

Queen of Green | May 26, 2015 | Leave a comment
Photo: How not to squelch a kid's curiosity about nature

To cultivate nature connectedness, fuel curiosity and keep plants and critters alive, we made rules.

Most children are curious explorers, so you don't need to do much to cultivate their nature connectedness — just take them outside! The challenge is more about how to get out of their way while keeping them AND the plants and critters safe.

Ick. Ew. Gross.

These are a few words adults say about nature — in front of kids. I don't think we even realize it.

Did I love finding a snail on my kitchen ceiling? Or an entire nest of baby spiders, on a stick, in my living room? Not exactly.

To cultivate nature connectedness, fuel my son's curiosity and keep plants and critters alive, we have rules:

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Good things are growing in Ontario's greenbelt

Science Matters | May 21, 2015 | Leave a comment
Photo: Good things are growing in Ontario's greenbelt

(Credit: Ontario Nature via Flickr)

By David Suzuki with contributions from David Suzuki Foundation's Ontario and Northern Canada Director-General Faisal Moola

More than half the planet's people now live in urban areas. The need to supply food, shelter, fresh water and energy to billions of urban residents is resulting in loss of farmland, forests, wetlands and other ecosystems, as well as the critical ecological services they support, like providing food, clean air and drinking water.

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Sea lice: An old problem that won't go away

Healthy Oceans | May 20, 2015 | Leave a comment
Photo: Sea lice: An old problem that won't go away

(Credit: Watershed Watch via Flickr)

By John Werring, senior science and policy adviser

Some things — like sea lice — just won't go away. Sea lice are a naturally occurring parasite of ocean fish and need hosts to survive. A sea louse's preferred host is an adult salmon, and the more fish there are in the water the greater the number of lice. Since wild salmon migrate, sea lice numbers in waters near the shore are typically low when the salmon are at sea and spike when the salmon return in the fall. When juvenile salmon migrate out of their home streams in the spring and enter the salt water, sea lice numbers are usually low (because they have no hosts to feed on during the winter), so encounters between fish and lice are fairly rare. There have been very few documented events where natural sea lice numbers are so high that they actually become a problem for wild fish.

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Signs of change are sweeping the nation

Science Matters | May 14, 2015 | 2 comments
Photo: Signs of change are sweeping the nation

In my home province, after a long struggle by elders and families of the Tahltan Klabona Keepers, the B.C. government bought 61 coal licences from Fortune Minerals and Posco Canada in the Klappan and Sacred Headwaters, putting a halt to controversial development in an ecologically and culturally significant area that is home to the Tahltan people and forms the headwaters of the Skeena, Stikine and Nass rivers. (Credit: Bruce McKay via Flickr)

By David Suzuki with contributions from David Suzuki Foundation Senior Editor Ian Hanington.

Recent events in Canada have shown not only that change is possible, but that people won't stand for having corporate interests put before their own.

When plummeting oil prices late last year threw Alberta into financial crisis, people rightly asked, "Where's the money?" They could see that an oil producer like Norway was able to weather the price drop thanks to forward planning, higher costs to industry to exploit resources and an oil fund worth close to $1 trillion! Leading up to the election, the government that ran Alberta for 44 years refused to consider raising industry taxes or reviewing royalty rates, instead offering a budget with new taxes, fees and levies for citizens, along with service cuts.

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