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Those damned Fraser sockeye

Healthy Oceans | October 25, 2014 | Leave a comment
Photo: Those damned Fraser sockeye

(Credit: toddraden via Flickr)

By Jeffery Young, Science and Policy Analyst

The Onion recently posted a satirical article titled "50 Years Of Climate Change, Habitat Loss Somehow Unable To Take Down Goddamned Parrotfish," a humorous account of how a species has managed to persist through a plethora of human-induced impacts.

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What Mount Polley can teach us about the Red Chris mine

Photo: What Mount Polley can teach us about the Red Chris mine

Kluea and Todagin Lakes, immediately downstream of the proposed tailings facility of Imperial Metals Red Chris mine. (Credit: Carr Clifton)

By Wade Davis, Honorary Board Member

The highest levels of corporate integrity and responsibility should be the standard for any new mine in Canada, and especially for one with as much potential as Imperial Metals' Red Chris project, situated at the heart of the Sacred Headwaters in remote northwest British Columbia. Imperial Metals has acknowledged that all exploration, regulatory and construction costs will be reclaimed within two years of the mine's anticipated three decades of active production.

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Clean-tech is good for the economy and environment

Science Matters | October 23, 2014 | Leave a comment
Photo: Clean-tech is good for the economy and environment

(Credit: Chris Yakimov via Flickr)

By David Suzuki with contributions from David Suzuki Foundation Senior Editor Ian Hanington.

What's the fastest-growing sector in Canada's economy? Given what you hear from politicians and the media, you'd be forgiven for thinking it's the resource industry, especially extraction and export of fossil fuels like oil sands bitumen and liquefied natural gas. But we're no longer just "hewers of wood and drawers of water" — or drillers of oil, frackers of gas and miners of coal.

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What the Flup? Bee-ware of new pesticide flupyradifurone

Photo: What the Flup? Bee-ware of new pesticide flupyradifurone

By Lisa Gue, Researcher and Analyst

While dithering over neonicotinoids — bee-killing pesticides banned in Europe — Canadian regulators are poised to approve a closely-related poison called flupyradifurone. We call it the new "F"-word.

Take action! Tell the government to reconsider its "kill bees first, ask questions later" approach to regulating pesticides.






Like neonics, flupyradifurone attacks the nervous system of insect pests. Both are systemic pesticides that are taken up by plants and move through their tissues into pollen, fruits and seeds. Both are also persistent, sticking around in the environment and, with repeated applications, building up over time.

Health Canada says flupyradifurone may pose a risk to bees, birds, worms, spiders, small mammals and aquatic bugs — familiar words to anyone following Canada's slow-motion review of neonics. When first introduced, neonics were touted as safer for humans than other insecticides. Treating seeds with systemic pesticides instead of spraying crops should be better for the environment, too, right? Wrong. We now know that dust from corn seed treated with neonics is implicated in large-scale bee die-offs during planting season in Ontario and Quebec. Not only is this is alarming in its own right, the dead bees are the proverbial canaries in the coal mine, signalling broader ecological consequences.

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Add low-cost, high-class shellfish to your weekday meals

Healthy Oceans | October 22, 2014 | Leave a comment
Photo: Add low-cost, high-class shellfish to your weekday meals

Old-fashioned Manhattan clam chowder is a great option for a cold day. (Credit: Karianne Blank)

Many people think shellfish are high-priced, high-class items served only at dress-up events. But they can actually be cost-effective, healthy additions to your everyday food repertoire.

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How to take your first step

Queen of Green | October 20, 2014 | Leave a comment
Photo: How to take your first step

Maude has made a commitment to reducing the waste she makes. Will you do the same? (Credit: Nadia Doiron)

As you read this, 50 families across the nation are taking steps to reach their "green" goals, impressing and inspiring their Queen of Green Coaches (and me).

They've completed the first, three-week module on waste. It's a huge category, with a wide spectrum of challenges and solutions — from curbing consumption, to implementing the three R's and reducing energy waste.

Want to play along and reinvigorate your commitment to your "green" journey?

First meet Maude of Montreal, who's come up with her own set of goals. She's five. (Her parents explained what the program is all about.)

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Commissioner's report shows Canada must do more for environment

Science Matters | October 16, 2014 | 1 comment
Photo: Commissioner's report shows Canada must do more for environment

(Credit: Prayitno via Flickr)

By David Suzuki with contributions from David Suzuki Foundation Senior Editor Ian Hanington.

Canadians expect to have our environment protected, and to know how it's being protected. A report from Canada's Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development shows we're being short-changed.

"In many key areas that we looked at, it is not clear how the government intends to address the significant environmental challenges that future growth and development will likely bring about," commissioner Julie Gelfand said of the report, which used government data, or lack thereof, to assess the government's success or failure to implement its own regulations and policies.

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