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Can emissions shrink while the economy grows?

Science Matters | September 14, 2017 | 3 comments
Photo: Can emissions shrink while the economy grows?

(Photo credit: Walter via Flickr)

By David Suzuki with contributions from David Suzuki Foundation Research Fellow Brett Dolter. Dolter is co-editor of the recently released Handbook on Growth and Sustainability.

What does climate change have to do with economic growth? Canada's prime minister and premiers signed a deal in December to "grow our economy, reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and build resilience to the impacts of a changing climate." The Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change outlines plans for carbon pricing, energy-efficient building codes, electric vehicle charging stations, methane emission regulations and more.

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People just like you are living off the land

Queen of Green | September 11, 2017 | Leave a comment
Photo: People just like you are living off the land

"In a world of more than seven billion people, each of us is a drop in the bucket. But with enough drops, we can fill any bucket." ~ David Suzuki

Métis singer-songwriter/university student/beekeeper Liv Wade and Christi Salyn, who runs a property management business, own and operate Heartfelt Farm on Salt Spring Island, B.C.

Liv grew up in the country. Christi was a city kid. Their mutual love for nature, animals and a healthy, sustainable lifestyle brought them together to grow food and enjoy the benefits of being close to the land.

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Nature offers solutions to water woes and flood risks

Science Matters | September 7, 2017 | Leave a comment
Photo: Nature offers solutions to water woes and flood risks

(Photo Credit: Jill Carlson (jillcarlson.org) via Flickr)

By David Suzuki with contributions from David Suzuki Foundation Senior Editor Ian Hanington.

When the Aztecs founded Tenochtitlán in 1325, they built it on a large island on Lake Texcoco. Its eventual 200,000-plus inhabitants relied on canals, levees, dikes, floating gardens, aqueducts and bridges for defence, transportation, flood control, drinking water and food. After the Spaniards conquered the city in 1521, they drained the lake and built Mexico City over it.

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Removing Bloor bike lane would be mistake, Olympic cyclist says

Photo: Removing Bloor bike lane would be mistake, Olympic cyclist says

By Gideon Forman, Transportation Policy Analyst

This fall, Toronto city council will debate whether to make the Bloor bike lane a permanent feature.

If councillors vote against it, the lane (currently a pilot) could be removed — its road markings obliterated, its "flexi-post" dividers yanked out of the ground.

It's a possibility that Olympic cyclist Curt Harnett finds baffling. "Why would we go backwards and remove bike lanes? Drivers are adapting to them. We're all getting used to them," he says.

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Study finds Exxon misled the public by withholding climate knowledge

Science Matters | August 31, 2017 | 1 comment
Photo: Study finds Exxon misled the public by withholding climate knowledge

(Photo credit: Mike Mozart via Flickr)

By David Suzuki with contributions from David Suzuki Foundation Senior Editor Ian Hanington.

Coal, oil and gas are tremendous resources: solar energy absorbed by plants and super-concentrated over millions of years. They're potent fuels and provide ingredients for valuable products. But the oil boom, spurred by improved drilling technology, came at the wrong time. Profits were (and still are) the priority — rather than finding the best, most efficient uses for finite resources.

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When times get dark, we must shine brighter

Science Matters | August 24, 2017 | 1 comment
Photo: When times get dark, we must shine brighter

(Photo credit: Mark Dixon via Flickr)

By David Suzuki with contributions from David Suzuki Foundation Senior Editor Ian Hanington.

Are we entering a new Dark Age? Lately it seems so. News reports are enough to make anyone want to crawl into bed and hide under the covers. But it's time to rise and shine. To resolve the crises humanity faces, good people must come together.

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Why Olympian Adam van Koeverden supports bike lanes

Photo: Why Olympian Adam van Koeverden supports bike lanes

Adam cycling on the Goat Creek Trail near Banff-Canmore. (Credit: Paula Findlay)

By Gideon Forman, Transportation Policy Analyst

People can't be divided neatly into cyclists and motorists, says Adam van Koeverden.

The 2004 winner of the Lou Marsh Trophy, given to Canada's top athlete, is himself a driver on some days, a bike-rider on others. He's not alone. "Most cyclists also spend time in a car, taxi or Uber," he explains. The goal isn't taking sides but finding a way for all road-users to move safely through the city. Toward that end, he supports separated bicycle lanes.

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