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Why Olympian Adam van Koeverden supports bike lanes

Photo: Why Olympian Adam van Koeverden supports bike lanes

Adam cycling on the Goat Creek Trail near Banff-Canmore. (Credit: Paula Findlay)

By Gideon Forman, Transportation Policy Analyst

People can't be divided neatly into cyclists and motorists, says Adam van Koeverden.

The 2004 winner of the Lou Marsh Trophy, given to Canada's top athlete, is himself a driver on some days, a bike-rider on others. He's not alone. "Most cyclists also spend time in a car, taxi or Uber," he explains. The goal isn't taking sides but finding a way for all road-users to move safely through the city. Toward that end, he supports separated bicycle lanes.

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Wildfires are a climate change wake-up call

Science Matters | August 17, 2017 | Leave a comment
Photo: Wildfires are a climate change wake-up call

By David Suzuki with contributions from David Suzuki Foundation Senior Editor Ian Hanington.

Wildfires are sweeping B.C. Close to 900 have burned through 600,000 hectares so far this year, blanketing western North America with smoke. Fighting them has cost more than $230 million — and the season is far from over.

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We only have one Earth, and we're overshooting its capacity

Science Matters | August 10, 2017 | 1 comment
Photo: We only have one Earth, and we're overshooting its capacity

(Photo credit: Emil Athanasiou via Flickr [cropped])

By David Suzuki with contributions from David Suzuki Foundation Senior Editor Ian Hanington.

August 2 was Earth Overshoot Day. Unlike Earth Day or Canada Day, it's not a time to celebrate. As the Earth Overshoot Day website explains, it marks the time when "we will have used more from nature than our planet can renew in the whole year." That is the definition of unsustainable and means we're using up the biological capital that should be our children's legacy. We would require 1.7 Earths to meet our current annual demands sustainably.

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An inconvenient letter to the editor

Photo: An inconvenient letter to the editor

Environmental Protection Act review could strengthen human rights

Science Matters | August 3, 2017 | Leave a comment
Photo: Environmental Protection Act review could strengthen human rights

(Photo credit: Márcio Cabral de Moura via Flickr)

By David Suzuki with contributions from David Suzuki Foundation Senior Editor Ian Hanington.

Governments change — along with laws, regulations and priorities. It's the nature of democracies. In Canada, we've seen environmental laws implemented, then weakened or overturned, then strengthened and re-instated. But the basic necessities of health, well-being and life shouldn't be subject to the shifting agendas of political parties. That's why Canada should recognize the right to a healthy environment in its Constitution — something 110 countries already do.

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Local action needed to resolve world's biggest problems

Science Matters | July 27, 2017 | Leave a comment
Photo: Local action needed to resolve world's biggest problems

(Photo credit: Hardi Saputra via Flickr)

By David Suzuki with contributions from David Suzuki Foundation B.C. and Western Region Program Coordinator Jennifer Deol.

Humans are an astonishing anomaly. As many species teeter on extinction, our populations grow in size and complexity. From exploring space to eradicating diseases and other remarkable achievements, human curiosity has pushed the outer limits of our physical universe. Yet our ability to embrace shared values has been challenging. More than a billion people live in poverty, inequality gaps are expanding, and we face unprecedented environmental challenges that threaten our survival.

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Plastic straws suck

Science Matters | July 20, 2017 | 2 comments
Photo: Plastic straws suck

Credit: Stephen Dyrgas via Flickr)

By David Suzuki with contributions from David Suzuki Foundation Senior Editor Ian Hanington.

Of all the plastic products we use and take for granted, plastic drinking straws are among the most unnecessary. Designed to be used once and discarded, their only real purpose is to keep your mouth from touching a glass or ice. It made more sense in the days when contaminated vessels were more of an issue.

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