Latest posts in Healthy Oceans

Want to eat healthier? Sustainable seafood is a great choice

February 4, 2016 | Leave a comment
Photo: Want to eat healthier? Sustainable seafood is a great choice

By Theresa Beer, Senior Communications Specialist

Did you know that ounce for ounce, salmon delivers more omega-3 fatty acids than most types of fish?

Health Canada recommends eating fish — especially oily fish such as char, herring, mackerel, salmon, sardines and trout — at least twice a week for its heart-protective benefits. Many of these fish are also good choices from a sustainability perspective, according to SeaChoice.

Omega-3 fatty acids can be destroyed by excessive heat when cooking. Baking, broiling, steaming and poaching is the best way to keep them. Smoked salmon is smoked at a low temperature and is usually higher in omega-3 fatty acids than cooked salmon.

Other oily fish that are in the most sustainable "green" category include: Arctic char, Atlantic mackerel, Pacific sardine and some species of farmed trout.

The revamped WildSalmonRecipes.com website highlights wild salmon recipes from some of the West Coast's most celebrated chefs.

Add some colour to your repertoire with three pepper wild salmon loaf. Add some spice by trying out chili grilled salmon with mango salsa.

Rock your holiday entertaining with tasty sustainable seafood treats

December 8, 2015 | Leave a comment
Photo: Rock your holiday entertaining with tasty sustainable seafood treats

Drunken garlic prawns (Credit: Melody Fury of GourmetFury.com)

It's holiday time! What better treat than delicious sustainable seafood appetizers and meals you can also feel good about serving?

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Send a message to Health Canada to stop GM salmon and protect wild Atlantic salmon

October 29, 2015 | Leave a comment
Photo: Send a message to Health Canada to stop GM salmon and protect wild Atlantic salmon

(Credit: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region via flickr)

Guest blog by the Ecology Action Centre
In late 2013, the federal government approved commercial development of genetically modified Atlantic salmon in Canada. The company seeking approval — AquaBounty Technologies — has facilities in Prince Edward Island where eggs are started and then shipped to Panama to grow into full-sized fish. The GM Atlantic salmon contains genetic material from chinook salmon and an eel-like creature named ocean pout. These genes are inserted into the Atlantic salmon to make it grow faster. Conventional farmed salmon take three years to grow to market size, whereas the GM salmon only take 18 months.

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When is carbon coloured blue?

August 5, 2015 | Leave a comment
Photo: When is carbon coloured blue?

(Credit: Alan Harper via Flickr)

By Anu Rao, marine planning specialist

We all know about kitchen sinks, but what about carbon sinks? These are ecosystems that suck greenhouse gases out of the air and store them in plants or in the soil under the plants. The gases stored in aquatic habitats are called blue carbon. When plants photosynthesize, they pull carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and store it in their roots and shoots. When they die and get buried in the sediment-laden water that flows into estuaries, this stored carbon is released through decomposition and captured in estuary soils. These richly organic soils can capture and store up to five times more atmospheric carbon than rainforests, an important function as the effects of climate change become increasingly severe.

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What the hake? B.C.'s largest fishery is turning fish into fish meal

July 30, 2015 | Leave a comment
Photo: What the hake? B.C.'s largest fishery is turning fish into fish meal

Hake: food or feed? (Credit: Artizone via Flickr)

By Scott Wallace, senior research scientist

Few Canadians know that the largest fishery on B.C.'s coast is for Pacific hake. Although it's a food-grade fish, the federal government granted permission last week, for the first time in nearly 30 years, to allow catches to be converted into fish meal.

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