Latest posts in Healthy Oceans

Sea lice: An old problem that won't go away

May 20, 2015 | Leave a comment
Photo: Sea lice: An old problem that won't go away

(Credit: Watershed Watch via Flickr)

By John Werring, senior science and policy adviser

Some things — like sea lice — just won't go away. Sea lice are a naturally occurring parasite of ocean fish and need hosts to survive. A sea louse's preferred host is an adult salmon, and the more fish there are in the water the greater the number of lice. Since wild salmon migrate, sea lice numbers in waters near the shore are typically low when the salmon are at sea and spike when the salmon return in the fall. When juvenile salmon migrate out of their home streams in the spring and enter the salt water, sea lice numbers are usually low (because they have no hosts to feed on during the winter), so encounters between fish and lice are fairly rare. There have been very few documented events where natural sea lice numbers are so high that they actually become a problem for wild fish.

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Rock out on rockfish!

April 29, 2015 | Leave a comment
Photo: Rock out on rockfish!

(Credit: Rowan Trebilco)

By Public Engagement Specialist Kyle Empringham and SeaChoice Market Analyst Kurtis Hayne

Ever eaten rockfish? It's delicious. You might even have taken a bite and not known it!

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Join Skipper Otto's and support local, sustainable seafood

March 10, 2015 | Leave a comment
Photo: Join Skipper Otto's and support local, sustainable seafood

Members picking up seafood shares at Granville Island docks (Credit: Clare Wheeler)

By Kyle Empringham, Public Engagement Specialist

Shaun and Sonia Strobel work out of Fish Locker D, just west of Vancouver's Granville Island. Once or twice a week, they open up shop for members of Skipper Otto's to come in and collect their shares of seafood.

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Squamish: What happens when environmental tools and policies align?

February 25, 2015 | Leave a comment
Photo: Squamish: What happens when environmental tools and policies align?

Britannia Mine was a huge source of pollution in Howe Sound's waters, until local residents and scientists took action. (Credit: Melinda via Flickr)

By: Theresa Beer, Communications Specialist

The small community of Squamish was once an epicentre for industrial development, so people there know a lot about the costs of cleaning up when industry leaves town. After decades of recovery efforts to clean up from timber companies, pulp mills, copper mines and commercial fishing, the town — and the Howe Sound region — is experiencing a remarkable marine revival. Residents see the benefits of intact ecosystems as whales and porpoises frolic nearby.

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The problem with conventional economics and the role of natural capital valuations

February 19, 2015 | Leave a comment
Photo: The problem with conventional economics and the role of natural capital valuations

(Credit: Kris Krug)

By Michelle Molnar, Environmental Economist

British Columbia's Howe Sound region is captivating. This ancient riverbed where forested mountains climb from the sea is also home to humpback whales, Pacific white-sided dolphins and spawning salmon and herring — and, as might be expected in such a beautiful area, a growing human population. Like all societies, the region's communities must decide how to direct limited resources to their best and highest use. This question of how best to use limited resources is the domain of economists. It is the most fundamental economic problem, yet some community members are wary of the development advice they're getting from these specialists. Why? Because they are well aware of the consequences of omitting key variables from the economic calculus.

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