Latest posts in Healthy Oceans

Why 2014's record-breaking ocean temperatures matter

December 15, 2014 | Leave a comment
Photo: Why 2014's record-breaking ocean temperatures matter

(Credit: EarthFix via Flickr)

By Jodi Stark, public engagement specialist

Our oceans are changing. They're still wet, salty and filled with fish, whales, clam beds, barnacles, sea birds, plankton, kelp, nudibranchs and billions of other creatures and plants. But sea levels are rising. Seasonal patterns are shifting. New critters are showing up where they've never been seen before. Others are disappearing.

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Orcas give us so much; we give them so little

December 11, 2014 | Leave a comment
Photo: Orcas give us so much; we give them so little

J32 Rhapsody, left, swimming with her cousin J34 DoubleStuf. 2012 photo. (Credit: Miles Ritter via Flickr)

Scott Wallace, Senior Research Scientist

As a marine biologist, I have had the privilege of learning about killer whales over many years. When I explore the B.C. coast with my family, sighting orcas is always a highlight of our outings. When I heard a southern resident killer whale, known as J-32 or Rhapsody, had died and washed ashore up the coast from where I live, I packed up my two children and left the house to bear witness.

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Helping childhood cancer patients with sustainable herring

November 25, 2014 | Leave a comment
Photo: Helping childhood cancer patients with sustainable herring

(Credit: Fishermen Helping Kids with Cancer)

A team of local fishers raised $225,000 in four years for cancer patients at B.C. Children's Hospital by selling folks the humble, but delicious, herring.

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Let's not gamble with the future of Canada's bluefin tuna

October 28, 2014 | Leave a comment
Photo: Let's not gamble with the future of Canada's bluefin tuna

(Credit: OCEANA/Keith Ellenbogen)

By Scott Wallace, Senior Research Scientist, David Suzuki Foundation

Canada is lucky to have a seasonal migration of one of the largest and fastest fishes in the ocean: the Atlantic bluefin tuna. Bluefin tuna can grow to up to 680 kilograms and reach three metres in length, roughly the size of a compact car, and have no natural predators. They can also swim as fast as 60 kilometres per hour and dive to depths of more than 1,000 metres to catch prey. Atlantic bluefin tuna from western populations travel from spawning grounds in the Gulf of Mexico every summer and fall to Canada's East Coast to feed on mackerel, herring and squid.

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Those damned Fraser sockeye

October 25, 2014 | Leave a comment
Photo: Those damned Fraser sockeye

(Credit: toddraden via Flickr)

By Jeffery Young, Science and Policy Analyst

The Onion recently posted a satirical article titled "50 Years Of Climate Change, Habitat Loss Somehow Unable To Take Down Goddamned Parrotfish," a humorous account of how a species has managed to persist through a plethora of human-induced impacts.

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