Latest posts in Notes from the Panther Lounge

Don't bee fooled: neonics are still toxic to honeybees

July 28, 2015 | Leave a comment
Photo: Don't bee fooled: neonics are still toxic to honeybees

(Credit: Sandy & Chuck Harris via Flickr)

By Lisa Gue, Senior Researcher

Did you hear that the honeybee crisis is over? This bold and surprising pronouncement appeared in Margaret Wente's July 22 Globe and Mail column, Good news: There is no honeybee crisis. Wente cites the latest survey statistics from the Canadian Association of Professional Apiculturists, which indicate fewer losses of Canadian honeybee colonies this past winter than the previous one. It is good news — although overwintering losses in Ontario were still double the level beekeepers suggest is sustainable.

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A look at North America's first regulatory restrictions on bee-killing pesticides

July 13, 2015 | Leave a comment
Photo: A look at North America's first regulatory restrictions on bee-killing pesticides

Happy Canada Day! Welcome North America's first neonic regulations. (Credit: Duncan Rawlinson via Flickr)

Ontario's ground-breaking regulatory restrictions on bee-killing neonicotinoid pesticides took effect July 1, 2015. Many David Suzuki Foundation supporters have written to us asking about the nitty gritty details. Let's take a closer look at what the new rules mean for Ontario and the rest of the country.

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Turning the dial down on risk from another Mount Polley

July 3, 2015 | Leave a comment

The decision on re-opening Mount Polley is imminent. B.C.'s chief inspector of mines says the government will implement the recommendations of the previously released independent panel report into the disaster.

By Theresa Beer, Communications Specialist

Mining — and resource development in general — involves risk. Nowhere was that risk more evident than in the images of the tailings breach and environmental devastation from Mount Polley last year.

While B.C.'s Information and Privacy Commissioner let the provincial government off the hook yesterday in terms of its disclosure of information, the commissioner highlighted the need to re-interpret Section 25 of the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act so that urgent circumstances are no longer required to proactively disclose information that is in the public interest. The report found information the ministries had about the mine did not meet provincial requirements to share the risks to residents. However, they had information about two events that they could have disclosed.

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Chiropractic college plays outside for 30x30 workplace challenge

July 1, 2015 | Leave a comment
Photo: Chiropractic college plays outside for 30x30 workplace challenge

Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College staff doing some tai-chi over lunch.

By Aryne Sheppard, Senior Public Engagement Specialist

This year, employees in more than 800 workplaces participated in the 30×30 Nature Challenge throughout the month of May. They spent 30 minutes outside every day, and posted photos of colleagues connecting with nature using the #natureiscalling hashtag and tagging @DavidSuzukiFDN.

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Ode to a tree named Jessica

June 29, 2015 | Leave a comment
Photo: Ode to a tree named Jessica

Primary students at Nova Scotia’s Wentworth Consolidated Elementary School with their tree, Jessica.

By Aryne Sheppard, Senior Public Engagement Specialist

This year's 30×30 Nature Challenge reached more than 700 Canadian classrooms from coast to coast to coast. In addition to their 30 days of outdoor activities, classes were asked to adopt a tree in their schoolyards and submit photos and stories to the Foundation. We received dozens of touching tree stories — it seemed impossible to pick just one!

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