By Dr. Peter Victor, David Suzuki Foundation Board of Directors

The current economic system has brought about unparalleled prosperity and well being to many. However, we have entered a new age of planetary boundaries which will impose profound shifts in economic practice while heightening the challenges of economic justice. Boundaries are new to our expansionist economic approach. With this new age must come new thinking, and with this new thinking must come new system designs and new institutions.

This video is part of an ongoing project to document the rise of a new movement — calling not for more economic growth, but LESS. The degrowth movement argues that through a voluntary reduction of the economy we can work less, consume less and live better, fuller lives."

August 3, 2010
http://www.davidsuzuki.org/blogs/panther-lounge/2010/08/life-after-growth---economics-for-everyone/

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2 Comments

Dec 25, 2012
8:14 PM

I’m an economist and financial analyst, so that probably puts me outside the mainstream of your audience. However I’ve read and agree with the Limits to Growth (1970) work. De-growthing and reducing humanity’s global footprint will probably require a reduction in global population as well as GDP. This leads to all sorts of intereting and difficult questions about how global income will be allocated, is the current slowing of population growth enough, how can we foster resource reducing technical progress, and to what extent can market forces help contribute to all this.

Mar 21, 2011
11:02 AM

For over forty years Canada has had a fertility rate that would result in population decline, but an immigration rate that more than compensates. Canada is projected to expand its population by another 10 million within the next forty years, despite having a fertility rate of 1.7. Historically Canada has always been about growth, and it seems to be an unquestionable part of our culture.

Even vocal environmentalists like David Suzuki don’t question the country’s perpetual population growth.

Why doesn’t Dr. Suzuki campaign for reduced environmental impact per person AND a stable population?

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