Latest posts in Science Matters

Local action needed to resolve world's biggest problems

July 27, 2017 | Leave a comment
Photo: Local action needed to resolve world's biggest problems

(Photo credit: Hardi Saputra via Flickr)

By David Suzuki with contributions from David Suzuki Foundation B.C. and Western Region Program Coordinator Jennifer Deol.

Humans are an astonishing anomaly. As many species teeter on extinction, our populations grow in size and complexity. From exploring space to eradicating diseases and other remarkable achievements, human curiosity has pushed the outer limits of our physical universe. Yet our ability to embrace shared values has been challenging. More than a billion people live in poverty, inequality gaps are expanding, and we face unprecedented environmental challenges that threaten our survival.

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Plastic straws suck

July 20, 2017 | 1 comment
Photo: Plastic straws suck

Credit: Stephen Dyrgas via Flickr)

By David Suzuki with contributions from David Suzuki Foundation Senior Editor Ian Hanington.

Of all the plastic products we use and take for granted, plastic drinking straws are among the most unnecessary. Designed to be used once and discarded, their only real purpose is to keep your mouth from touching a glass or ice. It made more sense in the days when contaminated vessels were more of an issue.

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Butterflyways blooming throughout the land

July 13, 2017 | Leave a comment
Photo: Butterflyways blooming throughout the land

(Credit: Suzanne Schroeter via Flickr)

By David Suzuki with contributions from David Suzuki Foundation Senior Strategist Jode Roberts.

Pollinator pathway. Bumblebee highway. River of Flowers. Bee Line. These have all described habitat corridors created to help pollinators like bees and butterflies. We can add Butterflyways to the list.

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Orca survival depends on protecting chinook salmon

July 6, 2017 | 2 comments
Photo: Orca survival depends on protecting chinook salmon

(Credit: VIUDeepBay via Flickr)

By David Suzuki with contributions from David Suzuki Foundation Senior Research Scientist Scott Wallace.

Two of British Columbia's most iconic species, chinook salmon and southern resident killer whales, are in trouble. The whale depends on the salmon for survival. Is it time to manage chinook fisheries with killer whales in mind?

In marine ecosystems, cause and effect is a challenge. It's almost impossible to claim with certainty that depletion of one species is caused by abundance or lack of another. The general rule is that big things eat smaller things, so any given species will eat dozens of others, even their smaller kin. The southern resident killer whales, also known as orcas, are an exception. Despite their immense intelligence, or perhaps because of it, their diet consists almost entirely of chinook salmon, with only traces of other salmon, and virtually no other fish species.

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Nature offers the best defence against flooding

June 29, 2017 | 1 comment
Photo: Nature offers the best defence against flooding

(Credit: Kurt Bauschardt via Flickr)

By David Suzuki with contributions from David Suzuki Foundation Senior Communications Specialist Theresa Beer.

Spring flooding in Canada this year upended lives, inundated city streets and swamped houses, prompting calls for sandbags, seawalls and dikes to save communities. Ontario and Quebec's April rainfall was double the 30-year average. Thousands of homes in 130 Quebec municipalities stretching from the Ontario border to the Gaspé Peninsula flooded in May. Montreal residents raced to protect their homes and families as three dikes gave way and the city declared a state of emergency. The Ontario government had to boost its resources for an emergency flood response.

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