Latest posts in Science Matters

Blue Dot Movement rolls across Canada

September 25, 2014 | Leave a comment

By David Suzuki with contributions from David Suzuki Foundation Senior Editor Ian Hanington.

As an elder, I've watched Canada and the world change in many ways, for better and worse. Thanks in part to cheap energy and technological growth, the human population has more than tripled, from 2.2 billion in 1936 when I was born to about seven billion today. As a boy, I could drink from streams and lakes without worrying about getting sick. My father took me fishing for halibut, sturgeon and salmon on the Vancouver waterfront. Pretty much all food was organic.

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Learning in nature is good for teachers and students

September 18, 2014 | 1 comment
Photo: Learning in nature is good for teachers and students

By David Suzuki with contributions from David Suzuki Foundation Connecting Youth With Nature Project Lead Rachelle Delaney.

Children belong outdoors. We know this intuitively, but now an extensive and ever-growing body of research supports it. Kids who spend time outside every day are healthier, happier, more creative, less stressed and more alert than those who don't. Several recent studies even show time in nature or green space helps reduce ADHD symptoms.

But what about teachers who take children outdoors, contributing to their learning and growth? More alert, calm and creative students are a plus to them as educators. Could they also benefit as individuals from taking students outside every day?

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Prescription for health: fight global warming

September 11, 2014 | 1 comment
Photo: Prescription for health: fight global warming

On September 21, more than half a million people are expected to gather in New York for the People's Climate March. (Peter Blanchard via Flickr)

By David Suzuki with contributions from David Suzuki Foundation Senior Editor Ian Hanington.

What if we could reduce worldwide deaths from disease, starvation and disaster while improving the health of people everywhere? According to the World Health Organization, we can.

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Of passenger pigeons and coal-mine canaries

September 4, 2014 | 1 comment
Photo: Of passenger pigeons and coal-mine canaries

By David Suzuki with contributions from Ian Hanington, Senior Editor

Passenger pigeons were once a remarkable story of nature's abundance. Despite producing only one chick a year, they were the most numerous bird on Earth, sometimes darkening the sky for hours or even days when they flew overhead. But then they told another tale — about the destructive power of humans. We killed them all. The last wild bird was believed to have been shot in Laurel, Indiana, in 1902. The lone captive survivor was named Martha; she died at the Cincinnati Zoo 100 years ago, on September 1, 1914.

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Mount Polley: A wake-up call for Canada's mining industry

August 28, 2014 | 2 comments
Photo: Mount Polley: A wake-up call for Canada's mining industry

(Credit: Left, Jeffrey Young. Right, Austin Baker.)

By David Suzuki with contributions from David Suzuki Foundation Communications Specialist Jodi Stark.

When a tailings pond broke at the Mount Polley gold and copper mine in south-central B.C., spilling millions of cubic metres of waste into a salmon-bearing stream, B.C. Energy and Mines Minister Bill Bennett called it an "extremely rare" occurrence, the first in 40 years for mines operating here.

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