Latest posts in Science Matters

Wild Pacific salmon face an upstream battle for survival

September 22, 2016 | Leave a comment
Photo: Wild Pacific salmon face an upstream battle for survival

By David Suzuki with contributions from David Suzuki Foundation senior communications specialist Theresa Beer.

Salmon have been swimming in Pacific Northwest waters for at least seven million years, as indicated by fossils of large saber-tooth salmon found in the area. During that time, they've been a key species in intricate, interconnected coastal ecosystems, bringing nitrogen and other nutrients from the ocean and up streams and rivers to spawning grounds, feeding whales, bears and eagles and fertilizing the magnificent coastal rainforests along the way. For as long as people have lived in the area, salmon have been an important food source and have helped shape cultural identities.

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Airline emissions are flying too high

September 15, 2016 | 2 comments
Photo: Airline emissions are flying too high

(Credit: Farhan Amoor via Flickr)

By David Suzuki with contributions from David Suzuki Foundation Senior Editor Ian Hanington.

In July, Solar Impulse 2 became the first airplane to fly around the world without using fuel. At the same time, the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration has been working on electric planes. These developments mean air travel and transport could become more environmentally friendly, with less pollution and fewer greenhouse gas emissions, and planes would be quieter.

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The simple-minded nature of human super predators

September 8, 2016 | 5 comments
Photo: The simple-minded nature of human super predators

(Credit Jeremy Weber via Flickr)

By David Suzuki with contributions from David Suzuki Foundation Science Projects Manager Rachel Plotkin.

Humans are the world's top predator. The way we fulfil this role is often mired in controversy, from factory farming to trophy hunting to predator control. The latter is the process governments use to kill carnivores like wolves, coyotes and cougars to stop them from hunting threatened species like caribou — even though human activity is the root cause of caribou's decline.

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In diversity, there is strength

September 1, 2016 | 1 comment
Photo: In diversity, there is strength

(Credit: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center via Flickr)

By David Suzuki

It's been shocking to watch news of the Brexit vote in Britain, Donald Trump's promise to build a wall between Mexico and the U.S. and the ongoing threats and violence against ethnic minorities in many parts of the world. I'm not a political or social scientist, but my training as a biologist gives me some insight.

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How much food can cities produce?

August 25, 2016 | 2 comments
Photo: How much food can cities produce?

(Credit: SPUR via Flickr)

By David Suzuki with contributions from David Suzuki Foundation Senior Editor Ian Hanington.

Humans are fast becoming city dwellers. According to the United Nations, “The urban population of the world has grown rapidly from 746 million in 1950 to 3.9 billion in 2014.” Sixty-six per cent of us will likely live in urban environments by 2050. The number of mega-cities (more than 10 million inhabitants) is also skyrocketing, from 10 in 1990 to 28 in 2014 — home to more than 453 million people — and is expected to grow to 41 by 2030.

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