Media

The David Suzuki Foundation is regularly consulted by media on issues relating to sustainability and conservation. Our scientific and policy experts welcome requests. To reach a Foundation staff member for comment, media are urged to contact a communications specialist (listed on the right side of this page). If you wish to use content from this website, read our copyright and permissions page. Please see the press releases below for our latest news, reports and events.

Great Bear Rainforest agreement applauded for honouring First Nations rights, protecting ancient forest watersheds and committing to conservation-based forest management

February 1, 2016

SciStarter adds first Canadian organization as a citizen science partner

January 28, 2016

The David Suzuki Foundation expands citizen science projects to include Canadians

The David Suzuki Foundation is teaming up with SciStarter to encourage science researchers in Canada to engage more citizen science partners through SciStarter's North America-wide database and international reach.

"Global collaboration on scientific research on the environment is crucial," said Darlene Cavalier, founder of SciStarter and professor of practice at Arizona State University. "We're thrilled to see growing involvement from the international scientific community, particularly from the David Suzuki Foundation, which works to conserve the environment and find solutions to some of Canada's most pressing environmental concerns."

"SciStarter will help us promote the concept of citizen science in Canada," said Scott Wallace, senior research scientist at the David Suzuki Foundation. "This hub of international science activity will make it easier to engage volunteers, track new projects and strengthen the value of citizen science with broader audiences." The Foundation's work includes a focus on ocean health, climate and energy, environmental rights and getting children into nature, all of which benefit from greater public engagement in science.

A citizen science project can involve one person or millions of people collaborating for a common goal. SciStarter's website connects scientists and community leaders to more than 1,100 citizen science projects and anyone wishing to contribute to science research.

What scientists and citizen scientists need to know

Scientists from around the world can add their research to SciStarter's Project Finder to be accessed by a network of project supporters and participants. Members can update projects in the same location.

Citizen scientists can identify research projects they'd like to participate in by searching the Project Finder based on type of activity, scientific topic, location and more. The website will soon include GIS functions to make it easier to find projects in a local community.

SciStarter programs are already shared in the U.S. with Serve.gov, a clearinghouse of national volunteer opportunities managed by the Corporation for National and Community Service and internationally through the United Nations Environment Programme's citizen science portal. UNEP considers SciStarter a valuable resource for sharing knowledge around the world to promote innovation and encourage scientific enquiry about the environment and other topics.

Media Contacts

Darlene Cavalier
Phone: 267-253-1310
Email: Darlene@SciStarter.com

Scott Wallace
Phone: 778-558-3984
Email: swallace@davidsuzuki.org

About SciStarter
SciStarter aims to enable people to contribute to science through informal recreational activities and formal research efforts. The website creates a shared space where scientists can connect with people interested in working on or learning about joint research projects. SciStarter features 1,100 searchable citizen science projects and recruits participants through partnerships with Discover Magazine and Astronomy Magazine, PBS Kids, the National Science Teachers Association, Public Library of Science, WHYY/NPR, Pop Warner Youth Scholars, and more.

About the David Suzuki Foundation
The David Suzuki Foundation collaborates with Canadians from all walks of life, including government and business, to conserve our environment and find solutions that will create a sustainable Canada through science-based research, education and policy work. Its mission is to protect the diversity of nature and our quality of life, now and for the future. Its vision is that, within a generation, Canadians will act on the understanding that we are all interconnected and interdependent with nature.

David Suzuki Foundation is hopeful that the landmark Paris Agreement will translate into global climate action

December 12, 2015

It required extending the United Nations conference on climate change by an additional day, but the global community has produced what is expected to become a global agreement to guide action on climate change beyond the year 2020.

"This agreement marks a pivotal moment in history," said the David Suzuki Foundation's director of science and policy, Ian Bruce. "While it may not be perfect, this text presents the first ever global agreement to eliminate fossil fuels and transition to 100 per cent renewable energy. It is ambitious and addresses many of the previously existing gaps in global climate action."

It required extending the United Nations conference on climate change by an additional day, but the global community has produced what is expected to become a global agreement to guide action on climate change beyond the year 2020.

"This agreement marks a pivotal moment in history," said the David Suzuki Foundation's director of science and policy, Ian Bruce. "While it may not be perfect, this text presents the first ever global agreement to eliminate fossil fuels and transition to 100 per cent renewable energy. It is ambitious and addresses many of the previously existing gaps in global climate action."

The David Suzuki Foundation is encouraged by Quebec's $25 million climate pledge to vulnerable nations

December 7, 2015

Quebec's commitment to provide $25 million dollars over the next five years to vulnerable nations to help them mitigate and adapt to climate change represents a leap forward in the role provinces play in addressing this international issue. At a press conference today at the United National Climate Conference (COP21) in Paris, premier Phillipe Couillard announced that La Belle Province will provide $18 million in mitigation support and $8 million dollars in adaptation funding along with $1.5 million to engage youth on the issue of climate change.

"This is a major leap forward for a province that has a long history of climate leadership," said Ian Bruce, science and policy director for the David Suzuki Foundation. "Quebec's willingness to act on climate change internationally, both in their cap-and-trade market with California and now through this financial commitment, should be a signal to the rest of the world that some provinces are showing leadership on climate change."

Quebec's past actions, particularly its partnership with the State of California, have inspired other provinces to step up their own solutions. Ontario is in the process of creating its own cap-and-trade system that will become a part of the Quebec-California carbon market and earlier this week Manitoba became the third province to commit to a cap-and-trade carbon-pricing plan.

"The Canadian delegation's approach here at COP21 has sparked enthusiastic support from other nations," said Bruce. "It is amazing to see the province of Quebec join the federal government in providing critical funding to the nations that are at the greatest risk due to climate change."

The federal government pledged $2.65 billion in contributions to the United Nations Green Climate Fund last week, but is yet to announce it new targets for reducing carbon pollution domestically. So far at COP21 the Canadian government has pushed for the inclusion of human rights and indigenous knowledge in the Agreement being crafted.

Quebec has adopted the most ambitious target of any jurisdiction in North America with a goal of 37.5 per cent carbon emissions reductions below 1990 levels by 2030. However, they have yet to outline a plan for how this target will be reached. Quebec's transportation section (representing over 40 per cent of total emissions) is one area where massive reductions are both possible and necessary. Promoting
electric vehicles and public transportation infrastructure should be a central part of the plan the province produces.

30

For more information contact:

In Paris:
Steve Kux
David Suzuki Foundation
00-1-604-374-5095
skux@davidsuzuki.org

In Vancouver:
Theresa Beer
David Suzuki Foundation
778-874-3396
tbeer@davidsuzuki.org

In Montreal:
Manon Dubois
David Suzuki Foundation
514-679-0821
mdubois@davidsuzuki.org