Media

The David Suzuki Foundation is regularly consulted by media on issues relating to sustainability and conservation. Our scientific and policy experts welcome requests. To reach a Foundation staff member for comment, media are urged to contact a communications specialist (listed on the right side of this page). If you wish to use content from this website, read our copyright and permissions page. Please see the press releases below for our latest news, reports and events.

Strengthening Alberta's carbon regulations is a good interim strategy on the road to a long-term climate action plan

June 26, 2015

The Alberta government's decision to strengthen its carbon regulation for large industrial emitters, known as the Specified Gas Emitters Regulation, is a promising step toward achieving a credible climate action plan for the province. The plan to raise Alberta's existing carbon levy on a portion of industrial emissions from $15 per tonne to $20 per tonne in 2016 and $30 in 2017 shows the province is prepared to improve the local environment and protect the global climate. This announcement marks a start to what must be a more comprehensive climate action strategy for the province that should include enacting an economy-wide price on carbon pollution, phasing out coal-fired power, prioritizing renewable energy, building energy-efficient homes and businesses and investing in public transit.

The Alberta government's decision to strengthen its carbon regulation for large industrial emitters, known as the Specified Gas Emitters Regulation, is a promising step toward achieving a credible climate action plan for the province. The plan to raise Alberta's existing carbon levy on a portion of industrial emissions from $15 per tonne to $20 per tonne in 2016 and $30 in 2017 shows the province is prepared to improve the local environment and protect the global climate. This announcement marks a start to what must be a more comprehensive climate action strategy for the province that should include enacting an economy-wide price on carbon pollution, phasing out coal-fired power, prioritizing renewable energy, building energy-efficient homes and businesses and investing in public transit.

Why is Quebec waiting to ban bee-killing pesticides?

June 17, 2015

Ontario restricts bee-killing neonic pesticides

June 9, 2015



International neonicotinoid expert presents findings in Toronto

May 28, 2015

Evidence is clear: neonics cause grave harm, must be restricted

TORONTO, May 28, 2015 — There is clear evidence that neonicotinoid pesticides harm a large number of non-target organisms including bees and other pollinators, according to a comprehensive review of more than 1,000 peer-reviewed reports conducted by the international Task Force on Systemic Pesticides. Jean-Marc Bonmatin, researcher at the French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS) and Task Force vice-chair, is in Toronto to share key findings as Ontario prepares regulations to restrict certain uses of neonics.

"As a scientist, I can now say conclusively that the evidence of harm is clear and points to the urgent need for action to reduce the quantities of these pesticides entering the environment," said Bonmatin.

Evidence is clear: neonics cause grave harm, must be restricted

TORONTO, May 28, 2015 — There is clear evidence that neonicotinoid pesticides harm a large number of non-target organisms including bees and other pollinators, according to a comprehensive review of more than 1,000 peer-reviewed reports conducted by the international Task Force on Systemic Pesticides. Jean-Marc Bonmatin, researcher at the French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS) and Task Force vice-chair, is in Toronto to share key findings as Ontario prepares regulations to restrict certain uses of neonics.

"As a scientist, I can now say conclusively that the evidence of harm is clear and points to the urgent need for action to reduce the quantities of these pesticides entering the environment," said Bonmatin.