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The David Suzuki Foundation is regularly consulted by media on issues relating to sustainability and conservation. Our scientific and policy experts welcome requests. To reach a Foundation staff member for comment, media are urged to contact a communications specialist (listed on the right side of this page). If you wish to use content from this website, read our copyright and permissions page. Please see the press releases below for our latest news, reports and events.

Yellowknife latest city to recognize citizens' right to live in a healthy environment

December 11, 2014

City joins Richmond, The Pas, Vancouver and Montreal in standing up for citizens' right to have a say in decisions that affect the people and places they love

On December 8, Yellowknife became the fifth city in Canada to recognize its citizens' right to live in a healthy environment, passing a municipal declaration that protects clean water, fresh air and healthy food, and gives citizens a say in decisions that affect people's health.

The David Suzuki Foundation's local partner in Yellowknife, Dene Nahjo, welcomed the news. "The people of the North are experiencing climate change daily and living with a mining legacy that doesn't embody responsibility, social justice or public health," said Dëneze Nakehk'o, spokesperson for Dene Nahjo. "To have the City of Yellowknife support a declaration for environmental rights shows bravery and leadership and sends a strong message to the North and the rest of the world that our most valuable resource is people."

The city joins Richmond and Vancouver, B.C., The Pas, Manitoba, and Montreal, Quebec, with many more getting ready to follow suit. "Cities from coast to coast to coast are joining this movement," said Sophika Kostyniuk, National Organizing Manager for the David Suzuki Foundation. "These cities represent almost two-and-a-half-million Canadians who now benefit from local governments that are putting the health of the people and places they love first." Kostyniuk said thousands of Canadians are already working to grow this movement in cities and towns across Canada. "This grassroots effort shows what can happen when ordinary people take extraordinary action, and in the coming weeks and months we'll see even more communities sign on."

David Suzuki Foundation communications and public engagement director Michiah Prull noted that mega-projects like Enbridge's proposed Northern Gateway pipeline, Kinder Morgan's Trans Mountain pipeline and TransCanada's Energy East pipeline have raised serious questions among Canadians about the protections in place for their health and well-being. "Local communities are rightfully calling for a say when it comes to important decisions that will affect the health of citizens and the communities they call home," Prull said.

He added that the ultimate goal of the Blue Dot campaign was to see a Charter amendment guaranteeing the right of every Canadian to live in a healthy environment. "More than 110 nations already have this right, but not Canada. It's time for that to change, and clearly cities are leading the way."

For information, contact:

Ian Hanington, Communications
David Suzuki Foundation
604-732-4228, X 1238
ihanington@davidsuzuki.org

Report finds climate solutions exist in Canada

December 10, 2014

By adopting provincial best practices, Canada could keep its promise to world

VANCOUVER — Canada could meet its international climate change commitment by using readily available made-in-Canada solutions, a David Suzuki Foundation report concludes.

The report, Building on the best: Keeping Canada's climate promise, used analysis by Navius Research to examine the best climate change policies and solutions being used in Canada and how they can be applied at the federal level.

"By adopting the strongest policies already in place in parts of the country, Canada could develop a unifying climate change strategy that would allow us to meet our international commitments and targets," said David Suzuki Foundation science and policy manager Ian Bruce. "As many have pointed out, including Canada's auditor general and UN secretary general Ban Ki-Moon, Canada does not have plans in place to keep its promise to the world."

The report found tremendous opportunity lies in leveraging the best of Canada's ingenuity, skills, workforce and abundant renewable energy resources to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, create economic opportunities and protect the health of Canadians.

By adopting provincial best practices, Canada could keep its promise to world

VANCOUVER — Canada could meet its international climate change commitment by using readily available made-in-Canada solutions, a David Suzuki Foundation report concludes.

The report, Building on the best: Keeping Canada's climate promise, used analysis by Navius Research to examine the best climate change policies and solutions being used in Canada and how they can be applied at the federal level.

"By adopting the strongest policies already in place in parts of the country, Canada could develop a unifying climate change strategy that would allow us to meet our international commitments and targets," said David Suzuki Foundation science and policy manager Ian Bruce. "As many have pointed out, including Canada's auditor general and UN secretary general Ban Ki-Moon, Canada does not have plans in place to keep its promise to the world."

The report found tremendous opportunity lies in leveraging the best of Canada's ingenuity, skills, workforce and abundant renewable energy resources to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, create economic opportunities and protect the health of Canadians.

Survey shows Canadians want action on climate change

November 28, 2014

Most see B.C.-style carbon tax as part of the solution

VANCOUVER — As Canada's environment minister heads to the United Nations climate change summit this week, a survey on Canadians' views about climate change reveals an overwhelming majority (88 per cent) want Canada to commit to significant new actions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

In the survey released today by the Environics Institute for Survey Research in partnership with the David Suzuki Foundation, Canadians express most concern (78 per cent) about what climate change will mean for their children and future generations. Scarcity of water and more frequent droughts; increased extreme weather events like storms and flooding; and disappearance of wildlife are also of concern to a majority of Canadians.

Most see B.C.-style carbon tax as part of the solution

VANCOUVER — As Canada's environment minister heads to the United Nations climate change summit this week, a survey on Canadians' views about climate change reveals an overwhelming majority (88 per cent) want Canada to commit to significant new actions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

In the survey released today by the Environics Institute for Survey Research in partnership with the David Suzuki Foundation, Canadians express most concern (78 per cent) about what climate change will mean for their children and future generations. Scarcity of water and more frequent droughts; increased extreme weather events like storms and flooding; and disappearance of wildlife are also of concern to a majority of Canadians.

David Suzuki Foundation supports call for moratorium on mining permits in northern Ontario's Ring of Fire

November 27, 2014

TORONTO — The David Suzuki Foundation has told the Ontario government it supports First Nations' requests for a moratorium on mining exploration permits in the Ring of Fire. The Neskantaga and Nibinamik First Nations have asked the provincial government to enact an immediate moratorium on mining exploration permits in the region — the biodiversity-rich boreal forest and Hudson's Bay Lowlands, more than 500 kilometres north of Thunder Bay.

The David Suzuki Foundation is working with the communities to help strengthen their capacity to engage in present and future policy, planning and land use decision-making processes, based on the shared objective of maintaining healthy landscapes that support traditional ways of life and provision of ecological services.

In September, Neskantaga and Nibinamik were two of nine Matawa communities calling for a moratorium on granting future and pending permits until First Nations and the Ontario government develop a regional protocol to address the issue, as they believe adequate consultations are not taking place.

"We agree that proceeding with development decisions while negotiations are under way is counterproductive," said Rachel Plotkin, Ontario science projects manager at the David Suzuki Foundation. "The David Suzuki Foundation strongly believes that before mineral exploration begins, sufficient investments must be made in the social capital of the affected communities, such as investments in community services, so they can successfully engage in government-to-government decision-making processes."

Neskantaga declared a state of emergency last year in light of alarmingly high rates of suicides and suicide attempts in the remote northern community. A Day of Action for the community, in which the David Suzuki Foundation participated, was held in Toronto this spring as the crisis continued.

The community continues to advance initiatives to heal from the traumas of colonialism, forced relocation and residential schools and to seek a positive path for working with the provincial government.

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For more information, please contact Jode Roberts, 647 456-9752