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Health Canada has 100,000 new reasons to rethink approval of controversial pesticides

November 5, 2014

OTTAWA — More than 100,000 people have told Health Canada's Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) not to register flupyradifurone, Bayer's latest bee-killing pesticide.

Over the past three weeks, Sierra Club Canada Foundation, David Suzuki Foundation and SumOfUs.org spearheaded a campaign to inform the public of the opportunity to submit formal comments to the PMRA.

"We shared the facts about flupyradifurone, and the response has been incredible," said Paul Ferris, of SumOfUs.org. "Over 110,000 sent a clear message to PMRA: Protect the bees."

OTTAWA — More than 100,000 people have told Health Canada's Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) not to register flupyradifurone, Bayer's latest bee-killing pesticide.

Over the past three weeks, Sierra Club Canada Foundation, David Suzuki Foundation and SumOfUs.org spearheaded a campaign to inform the public of the opportunity to submit formal comments to the PMRA.

"We shared the facts about flupyradifurone, and the response has been incredible," said Paul Ferris, of SumOfUs.org. "Over 110,000 sent a clear message to PMRA: Protect the bees."

Climate change solutions are in clean-energy revolution, world's scientists say

November 2, 2014

VANCOUVER — Global action on climate change is set to kick off a clean-energy revolution, which could rewrite Canada's economy. This is one key finding in the fourth and final instalment of the Fifth Assessment Report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released today from Copenhagen, Denmark. The report will inform world leaders as they prepare for the UN summit on climate change in Lima, Peru, in December. It focuses on global changes needed to protect human security, economic prosperity and food production from the impacts of climate change and extreme weather.

VANCOUVER — Global action on climate change is set to kick off a clean-energy revolution, which could rewrite Canada's economy. This is one key finding in the fourth and final instalment of the Fifth Assessment Report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released today from Copenhagen, Denmark. The report will inform world leaders as they prepare for the UN summit on climate change in Lima, Peru, in December. It focuses on global changes needed to protect human security, economic prosperity and food production from the impacts of climate change and extreme weather.

SPECIAL BRIEFING: Global Climate Change Assessment

October 31, 2014

VANCOUVER- The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has summarized the findings of the IPCC Fifth Assessment Reports (AR5) into a synthesis report for policymakers to be released November 2, 2014.

VANCOUVER- The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has summarized the findings of the IPCC Fifth Assessment Reports (AR5) into a synthesis report for policymakers to be released November 2, 2014.

Canada about to license another bee-killing pesticide

October 30, 2014

OTTAWA - Environmental organizations are calling on Health Canada to stop approving systemic pesticides that are toxic to bees and threaten to interfere with ecosystem functioning. The most widely used group of systemic pesticides, neonicotinoids, has come under increased scrutiny as a contributing factor in large-scale bee die-offs and other harmful effects.

OTTAWA - Environmental organizations are calling on Health Canada to stop approving systemic pesticides that are toxic to bees and threaten to interfere with ecosystem functioning. The most widely used group of systemic pesticides, neonicotinoids, has come under increased scrutiny as a contributing factor in large-scale bee die-offs and other harmful effects.

Site C dam environmental assessment approvals don't answer key environmental concerns

October 14, 2014

Concerns about cumulative impacts of the Site C dam project raised by environmental organizations and First Nations have been ignored in the joint environmental assessments approved by the provincial and federal governments today, said Jay Ritchlin, the foundation's director general for Western Canada. "Most importantly, the foundation supports the goals of Treaty 8 First Nations to protect their traditional territory, which will be severely affected by the dam's development," Ritchlin said.

Concerns about cumulative impacts of the Site C dam project raised by environmental organizations and First Nations have been ignored in the joint environmental assessments approved by the provincial and federal governments today, said Jay Ritchlin, the foundation's director general for Western Canada. "Most importantly, the foundation supports the goals of Treaty 8 First Nations to protect their traditional territory, which will be severely affected by the dam's development," Ritchlin said.